Update from ERA

In 2019, ERA successfully integrated three fellowship-trained radiologists. These physicians bring more depth and sub- specialization to the team.

Dr. Stephen Bradley Weldon is a board certified radiologist that joined ERA in September 2019. Dr. Weldon is a fellowship trained in Pediatrics and MSK (Musculoskeletal).

Dr. Brett MacAdam is a board certified radiologist that joined ERA in April 2019. He is fellowship trained in MSK (Musculoskeletal).

Dr. Bret Martel is a board-eligible radiologist that joined ERA in July 2019. He is fellowship trained in Nuclear Medicine.

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Meet the Radiologists

DILLARD JOE

Joseph Dillard, MD

Dr. Dillard is a board-certified radiologist. He is fellowship/sub-specialty trained in neuroradiology and interventional and vascular radiology.

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Services

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X-RAY

X-RAY technology lets doctors see straight through human tissue to examine broken bones, cavities and swallowed objects. Modified X-ray procedures can be used to examine softer tissue, such as the lungs, blood vessels or the intestines. The X-ray camera uses the same film technology as an ordinary camera, but X-ray light sets off the chemical reaction instead of visible light. 

Vascular Malformation Sclerotherapy/ Embolization

human vascular system

What are vascular malformations? Vascular malformations are blood vessels that did not develop normally before birth. The abnormally developed vessels can be arteries or veins; they may even include lymph vessels. Even though these abnormal vessels are present at birth, you may not know you have them until later in life. What are the symptoms? Venous malformations (abnormal veins) can cause pain, swelling, or changes in skin color. They can also bleed or leak fluids. Arterial malformations (abnormal arteries) can cause pain and bleeding. They can...

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Computed Tomography (CT)

Cat scan

Computed tomography, also commonly referred to as a CAT scan, is a medical imaging method that provides detailed 3-D images of areas inside the body. CT uses a thin beam of x-rays to take a series of cross-sectional pictures of specific organs or areas inside the body from multiple different angles. The CT’s computer then analyzes the pictures and constructs a three dimensional image of the area of interest. During some CT scans, a contrast medium, or “dye”, is used to outline blood vessels or highlight organs of the body so that they can...

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